DECUS NOPSIG Posters

The following DECUS NOPSIG posters were produced around 1990.  I was recent given copies in perfect condition so have uploaded them to archive.org as TIFF files suitable for reprinting.

Click on each poster for the archive.org link.  The text below each poster is written on the back of the originals.

The NOP SIG is dedicated to the retention, restoration and running of Nostalgic, Obsolute Products (NOP's).

Eight generations of PDP-8 computer architecture have come between the PDP-8 of 1965 and the DECmate III of 1985.  The PDP-8 was the original minicomputer that set DEC on the road to fame and fortune. It has been re-implemented every few years in newer technology.

  • 1965 - PDP8
  • 1968 - PDP8/I
  • 1970 - PDP8/E
  • 1974 - PDP8/A
  • 1977 - VT78
  • 1980 - DECmate I
  • 1982 - DECmate II
  • 1985 - DECmate III

This PDP-8 is on display in DEC's Australian museum.  It was sold with 6,14 bytes of mrmory and a teletype for $18,000.  The DECmate III shown has 98,304 bytes of memory, 800,000 bytes of disk and sells for 25% of the above.

No 1 in a series.

The DECUS NOP SIG is dedicated to the retention, restoration and running of Nostalgic Obsolete Products. (NOP's).

Twenty one years of Unix* software is represented here, between the PDP-7 of 1967 and the VAXstation 2000 of 1988.

The PDP-7 was the original computer on which Ritchie and Thompson wrote the UNIX* operating system at Bell Labs in 1967.

The VAXstation 2000 sitting on the butterfly table of the PDP-7 is running the Ultrix operating system.  It is showing 12 windows simultaneously.  This PDP-7, serial No. 60, was the third DEC computer to enter Australia.  It was installed at the Australian Atomic Energy Commission, Lucas Heights, on 27 January, 1966 and run for 14 years, clocking up 111,577 hours.  The PDP-7 was an eighteen bit machine with a cycle time of 1.75 microseconds.  It was notable for the solidity of its construction and for its weight-just over a half a ton!  It sold with 4096 words of memory and a teletype for $45,000. 

The VAXstation 2000 has 500 times the memory and sells for one quarter of that price.  This PDP-7 is on display in DEC's Australian Museum.

No. 2 in a series.

*UNIX is a trademark of Bell Labs

The DECUS NOP SIG is dedicated to the retention, restoration and running of Nostalgic Obsolete Products. (NOP's).

The poster was made by the DECUS NOP SIG to mark the 20th anniversary of the PDP-11 in 1990.

The poster shows three generations of the PDP-11.  On the right are two of the original PDP-11/20 computers mounted in the same cabinet.  The PDP-11/20 was released in 1970.  These units were used by the CSIRO to control an X-RAY diffractometer.  In front is an ASR-33 teletype.  In the middle is the PDP-11E10 of 1973 vintage.  

This was the first "packaged" system ever sold by Digital.  It comprised a PDP-11/10 central processor with 16,192 words of core memory, bootstrap, 2.4 Megabyte cartridge disk, dual magnetic cassettes and LA30 DECwriter console, all installed in a 6 foot cabinet.  This unit also had the LPS laboratory peripheral unit.  The package configuration saved 25% over the sum of the parts.  It was installed at the Preston Institute of Technoloy in 1974.  On the left is the top of the line PDP-11/70 of 1975 with console and expander cabinet.  This PDP-11/70 was the first RSTS/E machine installed in-house by Digital Australia - the famous node SNOE01.  These units are on display in DEC's Australian Museum.

No. 3 in a series.

The DECUS NOP SIG is dedicated to the retention, restoration and running of Nostalgic Obsolete Products. (NOP's).

After it was launched in October 1977, the VAX-11 / 780 quickly became the performance standard against which all following computers were measured.

The VAX-11 / 780 was rated as one VUP (VAX Units of Performance).  Even today, when the industry uses a benchmark known as SPECmarks, (issued by the Systems Performance Evaluation Co-operative), the VAX-11 / 780 is the reference point for one SPECmark.

 

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